“Hello…It’s Me…

…I’ve thought about us for a long, long time”  (sing along with Todd Rundgren)

Yup.  I’ve thought about us for a long, long time.  Through two computers, in fact.  I have killed two computers in one year!  And frankly dealing with anything computer-ish has been sickening for me!

Actually, I have been loving being computer-free!  I’ve had a lot more time for stitching and reading.  I’ve participated in a few stitch-alongs (SALs).  A couple have been blackwork!

One of three blackwork finishes in the past year.

One of three blackwork finishes in the past year.

Banu Demirel SAL

This is the beginning of a SEBA SAL around Xmas 2013

 

Currently…

I’m working on three SALs and in the last two weeks of a design class with Sharon Boggon.  The first project in the class was a monotone piece.  I used a kaleidoscope image of one of the patterns in the chess board that I made for Jeff.  Here’s the finished class piece:

Modern take on old form

Some old blackwork fill patterns mixed with some modern threads, a few canvas stitches, some embroidery stitches, and some beading!

Would you like to join me in the two blackwork SALs I’m doing?

Both are year-long projects.  One is a quick to stitch canvas take on Sashiko, very much like blackwork.  You could be caught up in less than a week.  The pattern is updated on the first of every month and is FREE.  You can find it (and a lot of other cool patterns) at Blue Dogwood Designs.  I am using my own colorway.

Pattern by Kay Fite at Bluedogwood Designs

My own rainbow colorway.

The other SAL is more time-consuming but a true joy for the blackwork freak (a non-derogatory 1970s term for someone loves something almost to the exclusion of all else!)  You will learn oodles and oodles about “journeys.”  You don’t have to do this as a reversible piece; in fact, I don’t think you can.  But you can practice tracking journeys so your backs will be very neat so when you want to do a reversible piece, you will feel more than ready.

In fact, for the first blocks I will be posting pics and notes about how I tackled each block so you have as few dark threads crossing as possible on the back side.  So if you’re anxious about how to tackle the more complex pattern, we can talk about it here.  We can help one another!

The best news is that the piece is designed by Elizabeth Almond, one of my blackwork heroines!  The design is called “Saving the Stitches.”  Here’s a bit of my work.  I’ve gotten quite a bit further on, but don’t have it photographed yet.  But, I think this will entice you to try your hand at this free pattern, too.

Elizabeth Almond's SAL

This the first 3 blocks. Not all metallics have been added yet.

Save the Stitches close up

Shows work a bit more clearly. I am loving stitching this. You will, too!

Are you convinced yet?  Get the pattern at Elizabeth Almond’s website with new installments on the first of the month every month for a year or so!  When you are ready to share your progress send me a note so I can link to your blog or website!

 

 

Blackwork SAL Starting May 17

Avis of “Oh Sew Tempting” is organizing a Mystery Stitch Along at her blog.  It will feature a design she has created.  Get the details at her blog.  I don’t think you have to do anything to join.  Just show up!  I’m going to!

I just finished my Seba Claire93 SAL that Avis mentions.  You can read about it and see it on the latest The Shop Sampler post.

Blackwork Journey

Ort Box with reversible blackwork

Reversible Blackwork: stitching the same on both sides of the canvas

The word journey keeps coming up for me these days.  Of course, thinking about the word journey leads me to think about blackwork stitching, especially reversible blackwork. (We’ll look at blackwork journeys much more closely in the future.)

It also makes me think of my two blackwork design projects, the mystery sampler and the thread sampler fabric book.

Since I’ve started my virtual apprenticeship with Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo to learn the process of creating Tibetan Buddhist thangkas, I was reminded that concentrating on the end product is not as valuable as attending to what is learned in “the journey.”

This is so true when I consider my impetuous and rather simple-minded plan to design a blackwork sampler.  By the time I’ve completed the design I will have learned about

  • thread and it’s interaction with ground fabric and one thread’s relationship to other threads
  • shading in blackwork by working with different numbers of strands of thread as well as different weights of thread
  • the process of design, kind of like how a child learns plaids don’t necessarily go with paisley
  • cultures that have been using blackwork in their designs for centuries
  • innumerable resources.that I can catalog and share here
  • and I will have met quite a number of people

Already I have learned

  • to slow down and look more closely at details, the small bits.  (I’ve always been a big picture kind of person.)  This requires a bit a patience
  • to accept that this blog is about sharing with others and documenting my process and interaction with blackwork embroidery.  It is not about producing something that will earn me followers and get big numbers.  (Although it is always nice to know you are not the Lone Ranger!)
  • loads about balance, not just in design, but in daily life.  I’ve always been kind of an all or nothing sort of person.  But so much is missed when you don’t follow “the middle way,” looking all ways along the way.

I am enjoying this journey.  And, after all, stitching is supposed to be fun!

What does your stitching life teach you?  How has stitching changed your life in little ways or big?  What kind of Journey are you taking?  Are you on the Blackwork Journey with me?

Blackwork in the Back seat

Yup.  That’s where blackwork has been for me for a while.  Kind of like it’s in the incubator of my creative brain, waiting to hatch.  Soaking up all kinds of warmth and light, sounds and sensations.

And guess what?!  There’s activity in the “egg.”  It’s about to hatch!  And you get to watch. This is what candling has revealed.

I  transcribed this pattern from a DMC publication written by Thérèse de Dillmont.  I believe it was published in 1908 as it is the Second Book.   There was another published in 1890, the year of Thérèse de Dillmont’s death.  Her niece, also named Thérèse de Dillmont, continue writing for DMC after 1890.

The title of the publication is L’ Art Chrétien en Égypte:  Motifs de Broderie Copte, Deuxième Partie.  Translated:  Christian Art in Egypt:  Coptic Embroidery Motifs, Part Two.   This pattern is on page 9, Panel (Planche) 4 , Design (Dessin) 18.

I found my copy of this pattern book at the Antique Pattern Library.  If you have not checked this resource out yet, you are missing out on an incredible treasure, just like Project Gutenberg.  On the home page of the Pattern Library, click on the catalog tab.  Then click on the technique tab and choose the type of pattern you are looking for.  DO NOT let the fact that many of the pattern books are in non-English languages.  Find yourself a translation tool at Google and you are home—Free!

Yes these patterns are free for you to use as there are no longer copyright holders to the text.  However, you Do Not own the pattern.  The person who approved the scan owns the pattern, thus is technically the copyright holder according to the Creative Common Licensing regulations.  In this case that would be: s cans donated by Sytske Wijnsma, edited Judith Adele 2006.

Bottom line, if you decide to use this pattern, you MUST give the total reference including title of the work, original author, and the owner of the hard copy.  But is that really such a big deal?  I think not!  (Oh, yeah, ignore the arrows before you use this pattern, my software wouldn’t let me remove them.)

Since I had a Major allergic reaction today, I’m going to end this lesson for today. Tomorrow you’ll get to see what is going to happen to this little Coptic motif.

I Had An Accident…

Blackwork Bow Tie

Blackwork Bow Tie

…and designed something with blackwork in it!  It happened like this…

I’m participating in Sharron Boggon’s (AKA Mistress of Pin Tangle, Stitchin’ Fingers and some pretty amazing stitching) Take a Stitch Tuesday, the challenge for 2012.  During the 13th week there was a break to give busy stitchers a chance to catch up.  After all, if you get frustrated and so behind the challenge might just become another UFO!

For those who were up to date there were two bonus challenge offered.  One of them was to create some “Bling,” some eye candy to inspire others using from 3 to 6 of the stitches from the challenge list to date.  For some reason “Bling” hit me.  And when I think of Bling I think “Black Tie.”  And, with my interest in Blackwork, my mind obviously jumped to Blackwork Bow Tie.  Here is what I quickly stitched up (based upon a sketch in my Studio Journal.)

The details are as follows:

Design Size:  5.5 inches by 3 inches

Materials:

And the stitches I used are:

So, do you like this pattern?  Would you like the pattern?  For free?  Sign up to follow this blog and leave a comment saying you want the pattern and I’ll email you the pattern!

Big News In Blackwork Embroidery!

At least I think so!  Got my newsletter from Berlin Embroidery today.  Tanja Berlin has a Mini Mystery Blackwork Project that is available for readers gratis.  That’s right—for free!  The first of three installments is absolutely charming.  I hope you’ll stutch it along with me!

Gathering Mystery Blackwork Sampler I Materials

Blackwork Sampler Materials
Gathering the goods!

I was torn about what to post today.  It’s a nice feeling to have ideas flowing.  Someone said the other day they would love to learn how to do this.  I almost decided to post on a basic lesson, but I think I will save that for the next post.

I did say I would show you the lovely red silk I found to use in this sampler.   And here it is.  It is from ThreadWorx, Vineyard Silk number V140.  Not too clear in the photo is a packet of YLI black silk floss.  The red sequins are 5 mm and are a Darice product.  The red fabric I’ll be using is a 16 ct evenweave.  Not shown in the photo are the black 11° seed beads I plan to secure the sequins with.  I may use another black fiber.  Not sure yet–I’ll play with that as I go along with the project.  It would be just as easy to use more than one strand of the YLI silk.  We’ll see.

Next post I plan to share a pattern for a blackwork mitten  and discuss how to tackle a pattern that has no instructions with it.   I will probably address the project in two posts.  One that talks about the actually stitching basics.  And a second about the topic of “Journeys.”That way I can begin to answer the question, “how do you do that?”

Are you planning to work this sampler with me?  What materials do you plan to use?