“Hello…It’s Me…

…I’ve thought about us for a long, long time”  (sing along with Todd Rundgren)

Yup.  I’ve thought about us for a long, long time.  Through two computers, in fact.  I have killed two computers in one year!  And frankly dealing with anything computer-ish has been sickening for me!

Actually, I have been loving being computer-free!  I’ve had a lot more time for stitching and reading.  I’ve participated in a few stitch-alongs (SALs).  A couple have been blackwork!

One of three blackwork finishes in the past year.

One of three blackwork finishes in the past year.

Banu Demirel SAL

This is the beginning of a SEBA SAL around Xmas 2013



I’m working on three SALs and in the last two weeks of a design class with Sharon Boggon.  The first project in the class was a monotone piece.  I used a kaleidoscope image of one of the patterns in the chess board that I made for Jeff.  Here’s the finished class piece:

Modern take on old form

Some old blackwork fill patterns mixed with some modern threads, a few canvas stitches, some embroidery stitches, and some beading!

Would you like to join me in the two blackwork SALs I’m doing?

Both are year-long projects.  One is a quick to stitch canvas take on Sashiko, very much like blackwork.  You could be caught up in less than a week.  The pattern is updated on the first of every month and is FREE.  You can find it (and a lot of other cool patterns) at Blue Dogwood Designs.  I am using my own colorway.

Pattern by Kay Fite at Bluedogwood Designs

My own rainbow colorway.

The other SAL is more time-consuming but a true joy for the blackwork freak (a non-derogatory 1970s term for someone loves something almost to the exclusion of all else!)  You will learn oodles and oodles about “journeys.”  You don’t have to do this as a reversible piece; in fact, I don’t think you can.  But you can practice tracking journeys so your backs will be very neat so when you want to do a reversible piece, you will feel more than ready.

In fact, for the first blocks I will be posting pics and notes about how I tackled each block so you have as few dark threads crossing as possible on the back side.  So if you’re anxious about how to tackle the more complex pattern, we can talk about it here.  We can help one another!

The best news is that the piece is designed by Elizabeth Almond, one of my blackwork heroines!  The design is called “Saving the Stitches.”  Here’s a bit of my work.  I’ve gotten quite a bit further on, but don’t have it photographed yet.  But, I think this will entice you to try your hand at this free pattern, too.

Elizabeth Almond's SAL

This the first 3 blocks. Not all metallics have been added yet.

Save the Stitches close up

Shows work a bit more clearly. I am loving stitching this. You will, too!

Are you convinced yet?  Get the pattern at Elizabeth Almond’s website with new installments on the first of the month every month for a year or so!  When you are ready to share your progress send me a note so I can link to your blog or website!



The Trouble With Trebizond

When I started to stitch on my Blackwork Thread Sampler project I wrote this:

Trebizond silk twisted filament

Product image from http://www.purlsoho.com

“I was going to use the Trebizond for the cover because it’s so shiny and pretty.  But I didn’t like working with the silk.  Let me be more specific.  I did not like working with stranded Trebizond.  I will do some more research to find out if there is a way to handle stranding the twisted silk so it will handle more neatly in the stitching.”

Today I was reading Mary Corbet’s newsletter and learned how to handle Trebizond and other filament silks.  I thought you might be interested in the info, too.  Also, by putting the link here in my blog, I will always be able to find the info when I pull that Trebizond out to make the Trebizond page in the Thread Sampler book!

And how about that!  As an old friend used to tell me:

“Bury a rock and save two birds!”

Blackwork SAL Starting May 17

Avis of “Oh Sew Tempting” is organizing a Mystery Stitch Along at her blog.  It will feature a design she has created.  Get the details at her blog.  I don’t think you have to do anything to join.  Just show up!  I’m going to!

I just finished my Seba Claire93 SAL that Avis mentions.  You can read about it and see it on the latest The Shop Sampler post.

Blackwork Journey

Ort Box with reversible blackwork

Reversible Blackwork: stitching the same on both sides of the canvas

The word journey keeps coming up for me these days.  Of course, thinking about the word journey leads me to think about blackwork stitching, especially reversible blackwork. (We’ll look at blackwork journeys much more closely in the future.)

It also makes me think of my two blackwork design projects, the mystery sampler and the thread sampler fabric book.

Since I’ve started my virtual apprenticeship with Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo to learn the process of creating Tibetan Buddhist thangkas, I was reminded that concentrating on the end product is not as valuable as attending to what is learned in “the journey.”

This is so true when I consider my impetuous and rather simple-minded plan to design a blackwork sampler.  By the time I’ve completed the design I will have learned about

  • thread and it’s interaction with ground fabric and one thread’s relationship to other threads
  • shading in blackwork by working with different numbers of strands of thread as well as different weights of thread
  • the process of design, kind of like how a child learns plaids don’t necessarily go with paisley
  • cultures that have been using blackwork in their designs for centuries
  • innumerable resources.that I can catalog and share here
  • and I will have met quite a number of people

Already I have learned

  • to slow down and look more closely at details, the small bits.  (I’ve always been a big picture kind of person.)  This requires a bit a patience
  • to accept that this blog is about sharing with others and documenting my process and interaction with blackwork embroidery.  It is not about producing something that will earn me followers and get big numbers.  (Although it is always nice to know you are not the Lone Ranger!)
  • loads about balance, not just in design, but in daily life.  I’ve always been kind of an all or nothing sort of person.  But so much is missed when you don’t follow “the middle way,” looking all ways along the way.

I am enjoying this journey.  And, after all, stitching is supposed to be fun!

What does your stitching life teach you?  How has stitching changed your life in little ways or big?  What kind of Journey are you taking?  Are you on the Blackwork Journey with me?

Giveaway over at The Shop Sampler

This is what I’m doing at The Shop Sampler.  Join in if you like!

Hurricane Sandy Embroidery Pattern Giveaway

Posted on November 3, 2012 by 

I’m slowing but surely getting back to regular life given traveling, the leg injury, and frozen shoulder—just like those effected and affected by Frankenstorm Sandy.

I have purchased an extra of a charming pattern created over at The Floss Box to help support the financial efforts of recovery from Sandy.  This is the image:

Pattern from The Floss Box

This pattern is being sold as a fund raiser for Frankenstorm Sandy survivors.

I will give my extra copy to the 13th person to like and/or comment on this post.

For those of you who would like to do the same on your blogs, here is the link to the page at The Floss Box.


Go to The Shop Sampler if you’re interested in participating.


I am taking a break from blogging (“Again?!,” you say) for a couple of weeks.  I have had a severe injury and we are heading south on October 15.  So, I need to heal, do what I can to help get things stowed away for hauling the trailer, and then have my 35 stitches removed.

If interested, you can read the saga at my latest post at The Shop Sampler.  Since then I have developed what looks to be a giant blood blister under one half of the stitching that I am hoping will resolve without becoming an open area, compromising the stitching.  The good news is that the hospital my Doc works at has a top rated wound care center.  I can vouch for it personally having been a patient there for several months after an annual visit to the barbaric practice of mammography.  The pressure caused a cyst to erupt and I ended up with an incredible mess that had to be debrided under general anesthesia. Thermal mammography is the only way for me now!

I am going to start the blackwork stitching, i.e., prep the fabric by hemming.  Will let you know when we get to Alabama unless I’m able to sit for hours in front of the computer before then, not to mention run around to prep photos, and all the other stuff that goes into a post.